MESSAGE FROM STATE CHAPTER PRESIDENT

Welcome to the Arizona State NWTF Chapter website. Our mission is the conservation of habitat for wild turkeys and other wildlife and the preservation of our hunting heritage in Arizona.

The Arizona State Chapter was formed in 1985 and has steadily worked to increase the distribution and diversity of wild turkey throughout the state. Today we have three turkey subspecies in Arizona: Gould’s in the Sky Islands in southern Arizona, Merriam’s in the central mountains, and Rio’s in the extreme northwest part of the state.

As one of only two states in the U.S. that have populations of the Gould’s sub-species of wild turkey, we have worked diligently with the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZ GF) to restore the Gould’s turkey to its native range. Today, sufficient numbers of Gould’s turkey exist in Arizona to restore harvestable populations in their historic range. Each year we raise funds for further Gould’s work by AZGF through a special Commissioners Turkey Tag card raffle.

While improving turkey numbers and distribution are important to our mission, there are many other programs in the state that are equally important. Since 1985, we have raised and spent over one million dollars on research, management, outreach to children, women and persons with disabilities, hunter education and community service. In addition to working on habitat projects, each year our Chapters distribute over 2000 turkeys to needy families during the holiday season, grant over $4,000 in scholarships to graduating seniors, and conduct three mentored turkey hunting camps every April for 240 junior hunters and their parents in partnership with other wildlife and youth organizations in Arizona.

All of this is made possible by the hard work of our volunteers conducting our annual Save the Habitat/Save the Hunt Banquets throughout the state. I encourage you to attend a banquet in your area where you can learn how to become involved with our efforts to protect and enhance wildlife habitat and our hunting traditions.

Thank you,
Fred Deneke